How to focus stack images in Photoshop

focus stacking landscape photography

Focus stacking is the perfect way to ensure your landscape shots are pin-sharp from the front of the image, all the way to the back. Learn how easy it is to blend focus stacked images together using Photoshop’s intelligent automated functions. This tutorial focuses on blending landscape images together in Photoshop, with a small amount of shooting advice.

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Use blur and contrast to focus attention in portraits

Use blur and contrast to focus attention in portraits

Learn how to focus attention in portraits using a tilt & shift style of blur, and also how to create a high contrast, diffuse glow desaturation technique that produces a punchy colour and tone effect. You can apply the whole technique in Photoshop, or simple use one of the individual smaller effects used within the main technique – it’s entirely up to you.

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Control colour luminosity in Photoshop

Control colour luminosity in Photoshop

Learn how to control colour luminosity/brightness with a Black & White Adjustment Layer in Photoshop. With this simple technique you can lighten or darken almost any colour in the image to achieve the perfect colour luminosity. The result is greater control over your images by increasing the impact of colour.

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Shooting video for cinemagraphs

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Cinemagraphs have taken the Internet by storm and creating them is a simple process that requires a slightly different approach to shooting regular stills. Quite simply that you have to shoot video from which a still will be taken from during processing. In this part one tutorial you’ll be shown the basics of shooting video. If you would like to jump ahead and learn how to create a cinemagraph in Photoshop click here.

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Create a cinemagraph in Photoshop

How to create a cinemagraph in Photoshop

Cinemagraphs are fun and surreal still images that display an element of movement. This is achieved by shooting a short amount of video footage, loading it into Photoshop, creating a still and then masking out selected areas to reveal the movement behind. By then saving the file as a GIF you have a cinemagraph. If you’d like to learn the basics of shooting video with your DSLR or mirrorless camera take a look at part one of this tutorial – shooting video for cinemagraphs – by clicking here.

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Create light leaks in Photoshop

How to create realistic light leaks in Photoshop

Digital photography is crisp, clean and overall much more consistent than analogue photography. This is great for the most part, but like most things digital results can quickly become too perfect. Relive the unpredictable nature of film photography and add a stylish retro effect to your shots by creating realistic light leaks in Photoshop. Here’s how it’s done…

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Fujifilm Film Simulation Modes for Raw files in Lightroom & ACR

Fujifilm Film Simulation Modes for Raw files

One of the great things about Fujifilm cameras is the ability to apply Film Simulation Modes to your JPEGs in-camera. These are a selection of settings that simulate the look and feel of some of Fujifilm’s best loved films including Provia, Velvia, Astia and more.

Raw files obviously don’t carry the film simulation data, so what happens when you shoot Raw? The simple answer, if you process your shots using Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom, is that you can apply them as a profile during processing. Here’s a tutorial to show you how it’s done…

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Process big stopper shots like a pro

Learn how to process your big stopper shots like a pro in Adobe Camera Raw with this in-depth video tutorial. It covers a number of important editing skills and will help you to make your big stopper images look their best. If you’re not familiar with the term ‘big stopper’ it simply refers to a 10 stop neutral density filter (ND).

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Bleach bypass effect in Photoshop

Bleach bypass effect in Photoshop

Learn how to apply a stylish bleach bypass effect in Photoshop. This effect desaturates images, boosts contrast and highlights texture in a similar way, but different, to Clarity in Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom. The bleach bypass technique comes from the days of film. It was achieved during transparency film processing the bleach stage was missed out, or bypassed. Here’s how to apply a bleach bypass effect in Photoshop.

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